1932

Abstract

On June 16, 2020, Zena Werb, PhD, died suddenly at age 75. Zena was a faculty member of the Department of Anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for over 40 years. She was one of the most cited scientists in the life sciences, with an H-index of 170. She was well known for discovering several matrix metalloproteinases and for defining their roles in development and disease. Zena Werb was a major contributor to the recent appreciation—and deeper understanding—of the importance of the tumor microenvironment. She achieved this by her scientific discoveries, by being a thought leader—responsible for several influential reviews in the field—and by mentoring several generations of researchers in the tumor microenvironment field.

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2021-03-04
2024-04-15
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