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Abstract

Robotic micromanipulation is a relatively young field. However, after three decades of development and evolution, the fundamental physics; techniques for sensing, actuation, and control; tool sets and systems; and, more importantly, a research community are now in place. This article reviews the fundamentals of robotic micromanipulation, including how micromanipulators and end effectors are actuated and controlled, how remote physical fields are utilized for micromanipulation, how visual servoing is implemented under an optical microscope, how force is sensed and controlled at the micro- and nanonewton levels, and the similarities and differences between robotic manipulation at the micro- and macroscales. We also review representative milestones over the past three decades and discuss potential future trends of this field.

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2019-05-03
2024-04-23
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