1932

Abstract

In general, foodborne diseases present themselves with gastrointestinal symptoms caused by bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens well established to be foodborne. These pathogens are also associated with extraintestinal clinical manifestations. Recent studies have suggested that and , which both cause common extraintestinal infections such as urinary tract and bloodstream infections, may also be foodborne. The resolution and separation of these organisms into pathotypes versus commensals by modern genotyping methods have led to the identification of key lineages of these organisms causing outbreaks of extraintestinal infections. These epidemiologic observations suggested common- or point-source exposures, such as contaminated food. Here, we describe the spectrum of extraintestinal illnesses caused by recognized enteric pathogens and then review studies that demonstrate the potential role of extraintestinal pathogenic (ExPEC) and as foodborne pathogens. The impact of global food production and distribution systems on the possible foodborne spread of these pathogens is discussed.

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2020-03-25
2024-04-23
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