1932

Abstract

Classic innate immune signaling pathways provide most of the immune response in the brain. This response activates many of the canonical signaling mechanisms identified in peripheral immune cells, despite their relative absence in this immune-privileged tissue. Studies over the past decade have strongly linked complement protein production and activation to age-related functional changes and neurodegeneration. The reactivation of the complement signaling pathway in aging and disease has opened new avenues for understanding brain aging and neurological disease pathogenesis and has implicated cell types such as astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and even peripheral immune cells in these processes. In this review, we aim to unravel the past decade of research related to complement activation and its numerous consequences in aging and neurological disease.

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2021-01-24
2024-06-20
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