1932

Abstract

In nature, insects face a constant threat of infection by numerous exogeneous viruses, and their intestinal tracts are the predominant ports of entry. Insects can acquire these viruses orally during either blood feeding by hematophagous insects or sap sucking and foliage feeding by insect herbivores. However, the insect intestinal tract forms several physical and immunological barriers to defend against viral invasion, including cell intrinsic antiviral immunity, the peritrophic matrix and the mucin layer, and local symbiotic microorganisms. Whether an infection can be successfully established in the intestinal tract depends on the complex interactions between viruses and those barriers. In this review, we summarize recent progress on virus-intestinal tract interplay in insects, in which various underlying mechanisms derived from nutritional status, dynamics of symbiotic microorganisms, and virus-encoded components play intricate roles in the regulation of virus invasion in the intestinal tract, either directly or indirectly.

Keyword(s): arbovirusinsectintestine
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2021-09-29
2024-06-19
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