1932

Abstract

Viruses are an important but sequence-diverse and often understudied component of the phytobiome. We succinctly review current information on how plant viruses directly affect plant health and physiology and consequently have the capacity to modulate plant interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments. Virus interactions with other biota in the phytobiome, including arthropods, fungi, and nematodes, may also impact plant health. For example, viruses interact with and modulate the interface between plants and insects. This has been extensively studied for insect-vectored plant viruses, some of which also infect their vectors. Other viruses have been shown to alter the impacts of plant-interacting phytopathogenic and nonpathogenic fungi and bacteria. Viruses that infect nematodes have also recently been discovered, but the impact of these and phage infecting soil bacteria on plant health remain largely unexplored.

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2018-09-29
2024-06-18
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