1932

Abstract

Evolutionary radiations are responsible for much of the variation in biodiversity across taxa. Cichlid fishes are well known for spectacular evolutionary radiations, as they have repeatedly evolved into large and phenotypically diverse arrays of species. Cichlid genomes carry signatures of past events and, at the same time, are the substrate for ongoing evolution. We survey genome-wide data and the available literature covering 438 cichlid populations (412 species) across multiple radiations to synthesize information about patterns and sharing of genetic variation. Nucleotide diversity within species is low in cichlids, with 92% of surveyed populations having less diversity than the median value found in other vertebrates. Divergence within radiations is also low, and a large proportion of variation is shared among species due to incomplete lineage sorting and widespread hybridization. Population genetics therefore provides a suitable conceptual framework for evolutionary genomic studies of cichlid radiations. We focus in detail on the roles of hybridization in shaping the patterns of genetic variation and in promoting cichlid diversification.

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2021-02-15
2024-04-18
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