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Abstract

Retinal function has long been studied with psychophysical methods in humans, whereas detailed functional studies of vision have been conducted mostly in animals owing to the invasive nature of physiological approaches. There are exceptions to this generalization, for example, the electroretinogram. This review examines exciting recent advances using in vivo retinal imaging to understand the function of retinal neurons. In some cases, the methods have existed for years and are still being optimized. In others, new methods such as optophysiology are revealing novel patterns of retinal function in animal models that have the potential to change our understanding of the functional capacity of the retina. Together, the advances in retinal imaging mark an important milestone that shifts attention away from anatomy alone and begins to probe the function of healthy and diseased eyes.

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2019-09-15
2024-06-23
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