1932

Abstract

With modern neurophysiological methods able to record neural activity throughout the visual pathway in the context of arbitrarily complex visual stimulation, our understanding of visual system function is becoming limited by the available models of visual neurons that can be directly related to such data. Different forms of statistical models are now being used to probe the cellular and circuit mechanisms shaping neural activity, understand how neural selectivity to complex visual features is computed, and derive the ways in which neurons contribute to systems-level visual processing. However, models that are able to more accurately reproduce observed neural activity often defy simple interpretations. As a result, rather than being used solely to connect with existing theories of visual processing, statistical modeling will increasingly drive the evolution of more sophisticated theories.

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2019-09-15
2024-06-22
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