1932

Abstract

Advances in retinal imaging are enabling researchers and clinicians to make precise noninvasive measurements of the retinal vasculature in vivo. This includes measurements of capillary blood flow, the regulation of blood flow, and the delivery of oxygen, as well as mapping of perfused blood vessels. These advances promise to revolutionize our understanding of vascular regulation, as well as the management of retinal vascular diseases. This review provides an overview of imaging and optical measurements of the function and structure of the ocular vasculature. We include general characteristics of vascular systems with an emphasis on the eye and its unique status. The functions of vascular systems are discussed, along with physical principles governing flow and its regulation. Vascular measurement techniques based on reflectance and absorption are briefly introduced, emphasizing ways of generating contrast. One of the prime ways to enhance contrast within vessels is to use techniques sensitive to the motion of cells, allowing precise measurements of perfusion and blood velocity. Finally, we provide a brief introduction to retinal vascular diseases.

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2021-09-15
2024-04-20
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