1932

Abstract

In our tendency to discuss the objective properties of the external world, we may fail to notice that our subjective perceptions of those properties differ between individuals. Variability at all levels of the color vision system creates diversity in color perception, from discrimination to color matching, appearance, and subjective experience, such that each of us lives in a unique perceptual world. In this review, I discuss what is known about individual differences in color perception and its determinants, particularly considering genetically mediated variability in cone photopigments and the paradoxical effects of visual environments in both contributing to and counteracting individual differences. I make the case that, as well as being of interest in their own right and crucial for a complete account of color vision, individual differences can be used as a methodological tool in color science for the insights that they offer about the underlying mechanisms of perception.

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2022-09-15
2024-04-24
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