1932

Abstract

Our vision depends upon shifting our high-resolution fovea to objects of interest in the visual field. Each saccade displaces the image on the retina, which should produce a chaotic scene with jerks occurring several times per second. It does not. This review examines how an internal signal in the primate brain (a corollary discharge) contributes to visual continuity across saccades. The article begins with a review of evidence for a corollary discharge in the monkey and evidence from inactivation experiments that it contributes to perception. The next section examines a specific neuronal mechanism for visual continuity, based on corollary discharge that is referred to as visual remapping. Both the basic characteristics of this anticipatory remapping and the factors that control it are enumerated. The last section considers hypotheses relating remapping to the perceived visual continuity across saccades, including remapping's contribution to perceived visual stability across saccades.

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2018-09-15
2024-05-29
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