1932

Abstract

Visual images can be described in terms of the illuminants and objects that are causal to the light reaching the eye, the retinal image, its neural representation, or how the image is perceived. Respecting the differences among these distinct levels of description can be challenging but is crucial for a clear understanding of color vision. This article approaches color by reviewing what is known about its neural representation in the early visual cortex, with a brief description of signals in the eye and the thalamus for context. The review focuses on the properties of single neurons and advances the general theme that experimental approaches based on knowledge of feedforward signals have promoted greater understanding of the neural code for color than approaches based on correlating single-unit responses with color perception. New data from area V1 illustrate the strength of the feedforward approach. Future directions for progress in color neurophysiology are discussed: techniques for improved single-neuron characterization, for investigations of neural populations and small circuits, and for the analysis of natural image statistics.

Keyword(s): colorcone-opponencycortexneuron
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2020-09-15
2024-06-22
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