1932

Abstract

T cells engineered to recognize and kill tumor cells have emerged as powerful agents for combating cancer. Nonetheless, our ability to engineer T cells remains relatively primitive. Aside from CAR T cells for treating B cell malignancies, most T cell therapies are risky, toxic, and often ineffective, especially those that target solid cancers. To fulfill the promise of cell-based therapies, we must transform cell engineering into a systematic and predictable science by applying the principles and tools of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology uses a hierarchical approach—assembling sets of modular molecular parts that can be combined into larger circuits and systems that perform defined target tasks. We outline the toolkit of synthetic modules that are needed to overcome the challenges of solid cancers, progress in building these components, and how these modules could be used to reliably engineer more effective and precise T cell therapies.

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2020-03-04
2024-04-14
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